Restoring landscapes for life

The Endangered Landscapes Programme is building a future in which landscapes are enriched with biodiversity, establishing resilient, more self-sustaining ecosystems that benefit both nature and people

Photo: Viktar Malyshchyc

Featured Project

Humber Estuary

Project Context and Aim

The UK’s Humber Estuary is internationally recognised for wintering, migratory and breeding waders (including declining species such as Eurasian curlew and bar-tailed godwit), grey seal and lamprey.

This project will assess the opportunity to create a coastal conservation corridor covering 32,000 ha. This would seek to reconnect a mosaic of currently fragmented sites that are key for biodiversity while providing societal benefits such as improved flood defence and a diversified local rural economy. The vision involves ecosystem benefits too: the restoration of mussel beds and reintroduction of 50,000 native oysters would filter contaminants and restore water quality.

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Latest News

Overcoming Barriers to Restoring the Białowieża Forest

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Białowieża forest is one of the largest areas of primary lowland temperate forest in Europe and in need of restoration. The forest straddles the border between Poland and Belarus, and the two countries have managed their portions of the forest in different, and sometimes conflicting, ways. In Belarus, for…

Marmots settling into their new home on Ukraine’s Tarutino Steppe

A group of steppe marmots, translocated to the Tarutino Steppe in 2020, are acclimatising well to their new home. Their…

Artists now in Residence in ELP Restoration Landscapes

The Endangered Landscapes Programme is delighted to announce the artists selected for the Endangered Landscapes Artist Residencies.  The selected artists…

Nature-based Solutions for climate change mitigation and ecosystem restoration

The final instalment of our landscape restoration and climate change mini-series is an interview with Megan Critchley who has been…