Restoring landscapes for life

The Endangered Landscapes Programme is building a future in which landscapes are enriched with biodiversity, establishing resilient, more self-sustaining ecosystems that benefit both nature and people

Photo: Viktar Malyshchyc

Featured Project

Humber Estuary

Project Context and Aim

The UK’s Humber Estuary is internationally recognised for wintering, migratory and breeding waders (including declining species such as Eurasian curlew and bar-tailed godwit), grey seal and lamprey.

This project will assess the opportunity to create a coastal conservation corridor covering 32,000 ha. This would seek to reconnect a mosaic of currently fragmented sites that are key for biodiversity while providing societal benefits such as improved flood defence and a diversified local rural economy. The vision involves ecosystem benefits too: the restoration of mussel beds and reintroduction of 50,000 native oysters would filter contaminants and restore water quality.

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Latest News

How we are using our projects to advance and apply knowledge of landscape restoration

We are delighted to announce that the ELP is funding five new projects to Advance and Apply our Knowledge of Landscape Restoration in Europe.  These grants are open to ELP and CCI partner organisations, and aim to draw on the expertise and skills that exist across these networks by funding projects that will enhance the…

Second herd of kulan arrives in the Ukrainian Danube Delta

The arrival of 20 more kulan on the Tarutino Steppe is part of a long-term reintroduction programme. The animals will…

New breeding colony of cinereous vultures confirmed in the Greater Côa Valley

At the beginning of November, Rewilding Portugal confirmed the existence of a colony of cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus), which confirmed…

Endangered eagle migration patterns key to their conservation

The Greater Spotted Eagle is in trouble. Almost extinct in western Europe, Polesia is a stronghold for the critically endangered…