Advancing and Applying Knowledge

The Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme aims to ensure that landscape restoration within the programme is underpinned by the best available science and that appropriate monitoring is used to measure the impacts of projects’ actions.

The Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme supports the projects that it funds to consider the existing evidence base relating to both the ecological and social aspects of restoration during their planning phase. Projects use a flexible but rigorous monitoring framework to select indicators that will demonstrate the effects of their actions and are encouraged to share the lessons that they learn.

Carrying out robust monitoring of the impacts of project actions is essential to build a knowledge base of what works and what doesn’t in landscape-scale restoration. Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme-funded Restoration Landscapes are also encouraged and supported to design and implement experimental tests of restoration interventions, to improve our understanding of effectiveness.

The landscape-scale nature of the projects funded by the Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme leads to a focus on the science behind large-scale restoration, with topics such as connectivity and dispersal, climate change resilience and the challenges associated with monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales having particular importance.

Please explore further below to see how science and evidence is being used and generated across the Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme projects.

Blak Stork - Taimuraz Popiashvili

Setting Priorities

The Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme engages in processes to identify the most important knowledge gaps and barriers to landscape restoration in Europe and to look for solutions to these challenges.

Evidence-Based Restoration

The Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme encourages the use of a diverse range of evidence in project planning, in order to ensure that lessons from others are applied and actions are more likely to be effective.

Monitoring Change

Robust monitoring is essential to demonstrate the impact and effectiveness of projects to policy-makers, funders, practitioners and the wider public.

Testing Interventions

Carrying out experimental tests of interventions can generate evidence to improve our understanding of what does and doesn’t work in landscape restoration.

Latest Related News

New study finds capercaillie nest survival could increase by 83% with diversionary feeding

Researchers have found that nests where diversionary feeding was deployed during the breeding season had an 83% increased chance of survival.…

From degradation to restoration: Measuring six years of progress

The Endangered Landscapes & Seascapes Programme has released in-depth monitoring data from six years of large-scale restoration across Europe, now…

A new toolkit to help navigate diverse perspectives in landscape restoration

People have diverse and strongly held views about landscapes, particularly when they are deeply embedded with places, potentially over generations.…



View all News