Advancing and Sharing Knowledge

The ELP aims to ensure that landscape restoration within the programme is underpinned by the best available science and that appropriate monitoring is used to measure the impacts of projects’ actions.

The ELP supports the projects that it funds to consider the existing evidence base relating to both the ecological and social aspects of restoration during their planning phase. Projects use a flexible but rigorous monitoring framework to select indicators that will demonstrate the effects of their actions and are encouraged to share the lessons that they learn.

Carrying out robust monitoring of the impacts of project actions is essential to build a knowledge base of what works and what doesn’t in landscape-scale restoration. ELP-funded implementation projects are also encouraged and supported to design and implement experimental tests of restoration interventions, to improve our understanding of effectiveness.

The landscape-scale nature of the projects funded by the ELP leads to a focus on the science behind large-scale restoration, with topics such as connectivity and dispersal, climate change resilience and the challenges associated with monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales having particular importance.

Please explore further below to see how science and evidence is being used and generated across the ELP projects.

Setting Priorities

The ELP engages in processes to identify the most important knowledge gaps and barriers to landscape restoration in Europe and to look for solutions to these challenges.

Evidence-Based Restoration

The ELP encourages the use of a diverse range of evidence in project planning, in order to ensure that lessons from others are applied and actions are more likely to be effective.

Monitoring Change

Robust monitoring is essential to demonstrate the impact and effectiveness of projects to policy-makers, funders, practitioners and the wider public.

Testing Interventions

Carrying out experimental tests of interventions can generate evidence to improve our understanding of what does and doesn’t work in landscape restoration.

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